Superstitions

Isn’t it funny how we all have our own little superstitions?  It may be an unwillingness to walk under a ladder (sensible if you ask me considering the things people drop from ladders) or a white elephant kept for luck.

As skeptical as I am I still have my own and I thought I’d share them with you.

  • I have an African devil that I keep by the door.  My father brought it back from African after a tour there in the 60s (before I was even born).  He’d been told by a local that when a devil would visit the tents of people to steal their souls he would see that a devil was already there and leave.  This masterful piece of salesmanship convinced my father to buy this ugly wooden figure and I now keep it to safeguard my home.
  • I follow the old adage that you should keep something for nine years and only throw it away if you haven’t found a use for it after this time.  Consequently my home is filled with junk that I carry from house to house whenever I move.  Most of the stuff I do keep does actually get thrown out in the end.
  • When moving into a new home it is important to place a house leek on the roof.  Traditionally this is for a turf roof but a potted one or a grow bag on the roof of the entrance will do.  It is supposed to keep lightning away from the house.

 I don’t, for a moment, believe any of these superstitions but I still follow them.  Perhaps it is out of habit or simply for peace of mind in an old tradition repeated.  Do you have any superstitions that you follow?

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26 Comments

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26 responses to “Superstitions

  1. floatykatja

    I follow a lot of the actorish ones, many of which have come from sound roots: the one about whistling in the theatre, particularly.

    I salute magpies, and if I see one on its own I look for another one (one for sorrow, two for joy …). My mother holds onto her collar until she sees an ambulance on seeing a single magpie, but that seems to be taking it a bit far.

    I have a jar of salt in my flat, given to me when I moved by my god-daughter. This is a German tradition, and it is supposed to ward off evil. I will often give salt to people as a housewarming present myself. Even if they don’t believe the superstition, salt is always useful! I will also throw salt over my shoulder if I spill it, to hit the devil in the eye.

  2. I don’t walk under ladders either..like you said..something could fall on me! :) and we also keep things for several years to make sure we really don’t need it..but the last time we got rid of those things it cost a bunch of $$, and we had to get a dumpster from the trash company to haul it all out! LOL

  3. I can’t walk over three adjoining drains.

    Don’t like ladders or scaffolding.

    Have to count stairs in my head as I walk up them.

  4. I salute the magpies

    I also used to have a thing about shadows falling over people in photos – just after my Nan died, i used to have to go round and move all the pictures slightly so no one was in shadow…

  5. Katja, bread and salt are always good gifts for the home. Very practical and very German.

    Darla, ha, I knew I wasn’t alone.

    Soupus, drains? I’ve not heard that one before but stair counting sounds perfectly normal.

    Jellyface, how does one go about saluting magpies? Is it a military salute? Do they have their own? I’ve heard of the shadows and pictures before but how can you avoid it?

  6. I say ‘hello Mr Magpie, how are you today?’ and then that’s it.

    you can’t really avoid the photo thing, it was just a weird fixation that i had in my head at the time, i don’t do it now

  7. Of course you don’t hon.

  8. I dont believe in superstitions. I think that all they do is hold you back from doing things.

  9. What, even the house leek one? They are very pretty.

  10. I read a text into the London Paper the other day. It said to go to the supermarket and buy a leek. Then put it under the sink and tell your housemate that there is a leak under the sink that they might want to have a look at. Then see what happens. I might be bored enough to try it one day.

  11. um but have you proof that the leek thing works?.

  12. Soupy, *groan* that’s awful. Besides which a house leek looks nothing like an eatin’ leek.

    F.A.B, of course it doesn’t work, what do you think I am? Crazy? I just like them.

  13. robd

    Is that African devil clearly visible from outside?
    It may keep the JWs away!

  14. RobD, sadly I think it would get kicked down the street if I left it outside. Instead it has the vital task of guarding my biggest bookcase….in case a devil wants to do a spot of reading or something.

  15. Becca

    It’s bad luck to be superstitious.

  16. Becca, it certainly is. I’m glad you pointed that out.

  17. hehe. well i was wondering.

  18. Heather

    I always take off my shoes before entering airport terminals because it helps the planes fly better…

  19. No. Not superstitious at all.
    Its incredibly liberating.
    The one which really annoys me is the ‘touch wood’ one.
    People say it every day, and then need to press on the MDF holding my computer off the floor. I find it very amusing.

  20. Zak

    I seem to remember something about the Emperor Charlemagne decreeing that all roofs in his realm should have house leeks on them to prevent lightning strikes !

  21. If that’s true then Charlemagne was clearly a genius and the houses in the Frankish Empire must have been the most beautiful of structures. Also free of lightning.

  22. peaceout

    you guys crazy

  23. peaceout

    completely untrue

  24. spider

    There is a superstition that if you find a frog in the house its very good luck! I hope its true because I found a small one in my livingroom about an hour ago. LOL I just wonder how the little bugger got in? It was one of those little treefrogs. Kinda cute, actually. :) I put him out on the porch because I like hearing those peepers chirp.

  25. If only I had a greenback for each time I came to hoverfrog.wordpress.com… Incredible post!

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